House styles

Even if you’re adding on, giving your home some extra curb appeal, or simply remodeling, having some knowledge about house styles can help you a great deal when developing a successful plan.


You will gain, also, a greater appreciation of the way your house was built and designed.

In this article, we are going to talk about numerous house styles but, it is very important to know that there are many variations within different styles, more than we could pleasantly enough discuss here. In libraries or in some larger bookstores you can find architecture guides that could help you identify certain designs or house styles. Mostly, the best technique for a starting point is to use the original style of your house for an exterior makeover but, in some cases, combining styles can energize a design.

In the 1930s, Cape Cod vas a very popular style for homes, even if its roots date back to 1675. Sometimes with 1-1/2 stories but typically with just one story, the Cape Cod style features wood siding, multi-pane windows, hardwood floors, and a steep roofline. Cape Cod home were originally fairly small. Most of the times, they boast dormer windows for added light, space, and ventilation.
Depending on the site and if you’re in need for more space, an addition can go on the back or on the side. You may find that the area upstairs is either incomplete or already remodeled because many of the original Cape Cod homes did not have a finished space upstairs. But this is a good thing because it can easily be changed in order to fit your needs.

In the 18th century (when France occupied a big part of the North East America, having settlements spread along the main waterways, like Great Lakes, Mississippi valleys, and St. Lawrence) the Country French style homes were born. After Jefferson purchased Louisiana (1803) the French building traditions began to vanish, but remained the same in New Orleans and other areas for another 50 years. Country French homes often have just one floor with paired shutters for many narrow windows, stucco walls, a half-timbered frame, and steeply pitched roofs.

Dating back to 1876, the Colonial style is amongst the most famous styles in the United States. These types of homes typically have two or three floors, wood or brick facades, and fireplaces. The kitchen and the family room, in the Colonial house floor plan, are on the first floor, the bedroom being placed on the second one.
Colonials are not complicated at all to add on in the back or at the side. Even if a brick façade could be difficult to match, the builder or the designer can help you find filling siding materials. If you go online, search for reproduction Colonial-style materials, like divided-light windows, in order to help you make a smooth exterior transition.

Most of the times, the Victorian houses feature a dominant front-facing gable, patterned shingles, a steeply pitched roof, cutaway bay windows, and an uneven façade with a full or partial-width front porch.

House styles

House styles

House styles

House styles